When does the events industry expect to return to the office?

We asked when you expect to go back to office life and how often you'd like to work from home.

With the vast majority of the events industry currently working from home or furloughed because of coronavirus, we wanted to find out when you expect to be able to return to the office. 

Just over 31% of you expect to be able to be back in the office by September/October, according to an online poll C&IT conducted last week. 

The second most popular answer was July or August, picked by 29.8% – and a quarter (25.2%) of respondents even said they thought they'd be back in the office by the end of June. 

Just under 6% said they didn't expect to be back in the office before 2021 and 5% said they expected to be working from home permanently.

When do you expect your office to reopen?

(449 responses)

 

We also asked how you would like to return to the office, assuming your employer can create a safe working environment. Nearly 41% said they would prefer to return to the office some days each week, compared to 22.5% who said they would like to return to the office full-time.

A similar number (21.6%) said they would be happy with just having occasional office meetings and just under 15% said they would rather work from home all the time.

If your employer can create a safe environment, how would you like to return to the office?

(419 responses)

A recent article by C&IT's sister publication People Management looked at how employers should conduct a coronavirus risk assessment before asking staff to return to the office.

Among the advice given by Anne Harriss, president elect at the Society of Occupational Medicine, were the following five points:

1. Identify hazards in the workplace 

This should include transmission, moving and handling, and chemicals in cleaning products used to deep clean the workplace. “Frequent hand washing could also lead to dermatitis,” said Harriss, adding this is something that should be considered and factored into potential hazards. 

2. Consider who could be harmed and how they might be harmed 

Think about hazards both in and out of the workplace. “Think about groups of people and how that harm might arise – for example, people working together or using public transport,” said Harriss. 

3. Evaluate the risk

“What is the likelihood of harm happening and what strategies will reduce the harm?" asks Harriss. Wearing face coverings is one option, but she also pointed out that workplaces should not use face masks for employees as this could deplete NHS supplies. 

4. Record your findings and reflect

5. Review it 

“Once you have done the risk assessment it should be treated as a living, breathing strategy and needs constant review,” said Harriss. “What has changed? What policies are needed?” 

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