LIVE UPDATES: Melbourne begins new lockdown measures

Find out which countries are on partial or national lockdown, what travel restrictions are in place and what size gatherings are allowed.

Lockdown status map

The map above shows which countries are on national lockdown (red), partial lockdown (amber) or are open with no lockdown (green). We will continue to update this map as we get more information.

Live global updates

Australia's second largest city Melbourne has entered a new lockdown to stop a recurrence of coronavirus. The new measures are expected to remain in place for six weeks.

Residents in metropolitan Melbourne will no longer be allowed to leave their homes unless it's for grocery shopping, caregiving, exercise or work, says CNN.

The Netherlands shut its borders to people from Serbia and Montenegro today, only a week after opening them, citing a rapid rise in coronavirus infections in both countries, reports The Guardian.

Travellers from Serbia and Montenegro regained access to the Netherlands on 1 July when the Dutch reopened their borders to a list of 14 countries outside the EU bloc. But Serbia has recently brought back strict lockdown measures to tackle a resurgence in coronavirus cases. 

Austria has also issued travel warnings for Bulgaria, Romania and Moldova because of the worsening coronavirus situation there.

In Serbia, protesters and police clashed violently in Belgrade on Tuesday evening amid anger over the return of strict lockdown measures to tackle coronavirus. Earlier on Tuesday, a weekend curfew was announced after a rise in Covid-19 cases in Serbia and across the western Balkans.

Colombia has extended its current lockdown measures to 1 August. 

While the quarantine continues, municipalities with no coronavirus infections or with low infection rates will be allowed to open restaurants, theaters and gyms under strict protocols, says Reuters.

Travel restrictions

This table contains information on which countries have inbound travel restrictions in place and what size gatherings are currently allowed there. C&IT is receiving new information from countries around the world all the time and we will update the table regularly.

What counts as a mass gathering?

The World Health Organisation's (WHO) definition of what counts as a mass gathering is as follows:

"High profile international sporting events such as the Olympics or World Cups as well as international religious events such as the Hajj count as mass gatherings.

"However, lower profile conferences and events can also meet WHO’s definition of a mass gathering. An event counts as a 'mass gathering' if the number of people it brings together is so large that it has the potential to strain the planning and response resources of the health system in the community where it takes place.

"You need to consider the location and duration of the event as well as the number of participants. For example, if the event takes place over several days in a small island state where the capacity of the health system is quite limited then even an event with just a few thousand participants could place a big strain on the health system and then be considered a “mass gathering” event.

"Conversely, if the event is held in a big city in a country with a large, well-resourced health system and lasts just a few hours, the event may not constitute a “mass gathering” event."

On the 29 May, WHO updated its guidelines on mass gatherings, including the following:

"Mass gatherings are events characterised by the concentration of people at a specific location for a specific purpose over a set period of time that have the potential to strain the planning and response resources of the host country or community.

"Mass gatherings can include a single event or a combination of several events at different venues, such as the Olympics.

"There are a diverse range of mass gatherings such as sports, music/entertainment, religious events, large conferences and exhibitions, and others. In the context of COVID-19, mass gatherings are events that could amplify the transmission of the virus and potentially disrupt the host country’s response capacity.

"COVID-19 is transmitted from person to person through respiratory droplets and contact with contaminated surfaces, and the risk of transmission appears to be proportional to the closeness (less than one metre) and frequency of the interaction between an infected individual and an individual who is not infected.

"Mass gatherings can be planned or spontaneous, but in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, relevant authorities should ensure that spontaneous events are kept to a minimum. These events likely do not have adequate planning to implement prevention and control measures to reduce the risk of transmission or the potential strain on health services."

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